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These are the most affordable days to fly and check into hotels, according to a study

Image: @kendalljenner/Instagram
Image: @kendalljenner/Instagram

As world travel reopens, many people are eager to plan when and where their next vacation will be.

New information provided by Bounce reveals the cheapest and most expensive months and days to visit some of the world’s top destinations.

The recent study analysed the average nightly cost of a three-star hotel, comparing both months of the year and days of the week, in 70 of the most popular tourist destinations across the globe.

July was found to be the most expensive month on average for a vacation in 11 of the 70 countries, while travelling in January showed to be the cheapest in 19 out of 70 of the world’s top vacation destinations, including Barcelona, Venice, and Rome.

Average daily hotel rates vary dramatically depending on the day that you book. The study revealed that Mondays and Fridays are the most expensive days to check into a hotel.

These days each had the highest average price in 14 and 15 of the world’s favourite destinations respectively, while Saturday proved to be cheaper. Checking in on a Saturday is less popular, which can save travellers money.

If you’re planning a trip Cape Town, it is important to note that the Mother City offers one of the highest possible hotel savings by day.

Cape Town ranked 10th on the list for highest hotel savings per day. The study showed that the cheapest day to check into a hotel is on Thursday and the most expensive is on Friday. Travellers can save up to R2 600 per night, a whopping 104% difference.

Beijing, China, topped the list as it offered a 419% difference in the average hotel cost when checking in on a Sunday.

The cost of visiting Beijing could look significantly different depending on the day you stay. While a hotel costs on average $35 (R527.08) for a night’s stay on a Sunday, the same room could cost up to $184 (R2 770.94) on a Wednesday.

See the full study here.

This article was originally published on IOL.

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