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This is what you should expect on 'Blood & Water' season 2

Image: Instagram (@netflixsa)
Image: Instagram (@netflixsa)

After raising the bar in season one, expectations were predictably high for the second season of Netflix’s youth drama series, “Blood & Water”.

Gambit Films, who have proven their Midas touch with “Indemnity”, “Nommer 37”, “Ellen: The Ellen Pakkies Story”, “Suidooster, Noem My Skollie” and “Walk a Mile in My Shoes”, don’t disappoint once again.

I got a sneak peek at five of the seven episodes ahead of its release on Heritage Day and I was truly blown away.

Of course, the suspense is killing me as I wait for a few more days to catch the final two episodes, which is a testament to the skilful storytelling of the creatives.

They leave you addicted and on tenterhooks.

The second season picks up several weeks from where the first one ended.

Puleng Khumalo (Ama Qamata) is both furious and noticeably ashamed of her father Julius’s (Getmore Sithole) scandalous trial.

All attempts by her mother Thandeka (Gail Mabalane) to quell the tension in the household falls by the wayside.

There’s also another hurdle as Fikile Bhele (Khosi Ngema) takes out a restraining order against Puleng after that whole #sidechickchronicles debacle.

Of course, since both of them attend Parkhurst High, it becomes a little trickier for principal Nicole Daniels (Sandi Schultz) to oversee.

And so the first day back at school kicks off with a showdown between Puleng and Fiks, which fascinates the new pupil, Sam Nkosana (Leroy Siyafa).

Let’s just say, he can’t take his eyes off Fiks.

Not long after, the students pick sides between Team Puleng or Team Fiks.

Since blowing up on social media, Puleng’s has also become as popular as Fiks.

Of course, it doesn’t hurt that she is dating the school hunk, Karabo “KB” Molapo (Thabang Molaba).

The strait-laced Wade Daniels (Dillon Windvogel) takes over the Chief Editor role of the school magazine, much to the chagrin of Wendy Dlamini (Natasha Thahane).

And a free-spirited Zama Bolton (Cindy Mahlangu), who has no filter when it comes to speaking her mind, tires of her love triangle with Chris Ackerman (Arno Greeff) and his boyfriend and breaks up with him.

Then there is Reece van Rensburg’s (Greteli Fincham) mother, who has fallen off the wagon again and needs to go back to rehab.

But the cost weighs heavily on Reece and she is forced to expand her side-line hustle by recruiting two new pushers and partners with a new supplier.

After a bit of back and forth, Tahira Kahn (Mekaila Mathys) and Wade start dating.

But his close friendship with Puleng becomes a thorn in this new relationship, more so when they become “parents” to Spiyoyo (an egg) in life orientation class.

Restraining order aside, Puleng hasn’t taken her eye off the ball - she is determined to prove that Fiks is in fact her sister Phumelele, who was abducted at birth.

And she’s like a dog with a bone as the end justifies the means. This places her relationship with KB in a very precarious position, more so as she tries to snoop into the affairs of his wealthy father Matla Molapo (Sello Maake Ka-Ncube), whom she believes is connected to it in some way.

Her suspicions are not far-fetched though as Matla is behind the employment of the school’s heavily pregnant new councillor Janet Nkosana (Zikhona Sodlaka), who also happens to be Sam’s mother.

And that’s what I love about the storytelling on the show.

The writers have ingeniously penned this web of intrigue, laden with stumbling blocks, intense drama and a sprinkling of light-hearted moments.

The viewer connects deeply with each and every character and their respective journey.

While some of their actions may be deemed selfish, manipulative and just plain reckless, they redeem themselves since it is done with good intentions.

Everything about the series, from the cast, directing, screenplay to cinematography and production value, is first-rate.

Amid the crime-solving, the series explores all the teen angst frustrations that come with having overbearing parents – as well as those not present.

There’s also the usual afflictions from heartbreak, hookups, jealousy, addiction to insecurity.

And the soundtrack is pretty dope too.

“Blood & Water” season has a sublime cast delivering unparalleled performances and it is masterfully directed and edited.

The second season of “Blood & Water” will be available to stream on Netflix from September 24.

This article originally appeared on IOL

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